Category: Events


 

forest

 Image is from “This Oregon Life”

 

We live in a state with abundant forests, and yet we don’t all see the same thing when we look into the woods. Oregon is known for both its timber industry and its deep environmental values. What are the beliefs we have about our forests and what will we, as a state, do to steward, manage, and protect this special resource?

This is the focus of “Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Stewarding Our Public Lands,” a free conversation with Mariah Action on Thursday, June 7, 2018, at 4:00 p.m. at Cannon Beach History Center & Museum, 1387 South Spruce Street. This program is hosted by Cannon Beach History Center & Museum and sponsored by Oregon Humanities.

Mariah Acton is a soon-to-be graduate from the University of Oregon, where her master’s work focuses at the intersection of conflict resolution, nonprofit management, and public administration. As a recent social science researcher for the US Forest Service and a volunteer facilitator with forest collaboratives in the southern Willamette Valley, she recognizes that this is an exciting time for public-driven, sustainable forest management, and she appreciates that there are more conversations to be had.

Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. For more information about this free community discussion, please contact Elaine Trucke at 503-436-9301 or elaine@cbhistory.org.

Oregon Humanities (921 SW Washington, Suite 150; Portland, OR 97205) connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Public Program Grants, Responsive Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust

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Olivia Millerschin Concert

olivia millerschin

On Sunday, May 6 at 7:00 p.m., the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum welcomes Olivia Millerschin and her band all the way from Michigan. Only three performances in Oregon, you’ll want to get your tickets soon.

At just twenty-two, singer-songwriter Olivia Millerschin has composed and released two full-length albums. Her second, “Look Both Ways” has recently been nominated for an Independent Music Award in the category of Best Adult Contemporary Album. A Detroit, Michigan native, Millerschin is making a small tour around the Pacific Northwest in May with only three stops in Oregon! She recently celebrated her second John Lennon Songwriting Award with a main stage showcase at NAMM 2018. Her voice was also heard in the 2018 Olympics Ice Dancing competition for skaters Madison Chock and Evan Bates. She was a quarter finalist on America’s Got Talent, has won the great American Song Contest, and is featured on Republic Records soundtrack to Mitch Albom’s latest novel. Millerschin also has had her music and voice featured in national film and television. She plays the ukulele, piano, guitar, and headlines national tours. She’s also opened for many established artists. Did we mention that she’s just twenty-two?

Millerschin has received accolades for her celestial voice and old soul style. She performs a blend of vintage folk and modern pop.

“Olivia has a voice far beyond her years — gentle and lilting, and filled with the emotions that riddle her lyrics. Look Both Ways straddles the line of folk and electronic, like artists such as Sara Bareilles and Ingrid Michaelson.” – 60 Best Albums of 2016 – DittyTV Staff Picks

”Olivia Millerschin is producing some of the best regional music right now and should be a star.” – Lemonade Magazine
“Olivia has a voice you melt into – it is beautiful, innocent, soulful and note perfect despite reaching some notes only dogs can hear!… As far as ‘uniqueness’ is concerned, this American has it in spades.” – Nottingham Post
Millerschin’s second album Look Both Ways is an infusion of clever lyrics, haunting melodies, colorful folk, pop, and soul. Produced in Brooklyn and Detroit, the album mirrors the grit and hopefulness of both cities and reflects her quest to “look both ways” as she relishes in the good while proceeding with caution in a complex music industry and world.

Tickets to this concert are $15 each and include complimentary refreshments. Seating is limit and it is believed that this concert will sell out quickly. You may purchase tickets online at cbhistory.org/shop or by phone at 503-436-9301. Tickets include complimentary refreshments. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. for this event.

 

Early Settlements

Artwork is from Archaeology Magazine.

 

Archaeological work in the Americas has been causing a lot of controversy. It seems that the Americas may have been settled a lot earlier than hypothesized – a lot earlier! Most recently, a site in California appears to push human activity back to between 120,000 and 140,000 years ago. This is more than a hundred thousand years before humans were thought by archaeologists to be here. This site is among a few other recent discoveries, which include Paisley Caves that are rewriting the human history of the Americas.

On Thursday, April 19 at 4:00 p.m. the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum welcomes Dr. Cameron M. Smith to discuss this very topic. Dr. Smith is an Anthropology Professor at Portland State University and is a highly recognized scholar on human history, archaeology and evolution.

Dr. Smith will be discussing the old and new theories about the earliest dispersals of humans into the Americas. Whether by land or sea, these new archaeological sites bring about new questions. His talk, “By land, Se and Shore: New Evidence and Theories on the Earliest Human Dispersals into the Americas,” will be free and open to the public.

Dr. Smith has a PhD in Archaeology from Canada’s Simon Fraser University and is a respected scholar, who has published scientific works in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, as well as Scientific American, Scientific American MIND, Discover Magazine, Archaeology Magazine, South American Explorer, Spaceflight, Skeptical Inquirer, The Next Step, and The Bulletin of Primitive Technologcam_durham_2011y.

Dr. Smith has also appeared on PBS, The History Channel, and on the National Geographic channel. Smith was even a guest on Theoretical Physicist Michio Kaku’s radio show Science Fantastic.

For those who have not attended a lecture by Dr. Smith, you are in for a treat! He is an engaging lecturer who keeps attendees on the edge of their seats. You won’t want the lecture to end!

This event is free and open to the public.

This event has been brought to you by Clatsop County and Inn at Cannon Beach.

For more information about Cameron M. Smith – http://cameronmsmith.com/

 

 

 

Are you fascinated with shipwrecks? Do you find yourself watching too many historical shows and movies about pirates, ships, or swashbuckling archaeologists? Then we have the perfect event for you.

Join us on Thursday, March 15 at 4 p.m. for a lecture on Oregon coast shipwrecks with marine archaeologist Chris Dewey. Dewey, MA, RPA, is a retired Naval Officer, instructor of archaeology and anthropology at Clatsop Community College, and President of the Maritime Archaeological Society (MAS). Headquartered in Astoria, Oregon, MAS was created to help document and share maritime history with the public. The Oregon coast is home to thousands of shipwrecks, some discovered and some not. It’s the MAS mission to assist archaeologists in locating, documenting, and conserving artifacts related to shipwrecks and other submerged archaeological sites.

Dewey will discuss the tools, techniques, and strategies used to discover and investigate shipwrecks and their histories. He will cover some of the greater- and lesser-known shipwrecks in our area and the efforts to locate and document their wreck sites.

The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum is a private non-profit that endeavors to make history available to all by offering donation-based admission. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Complimentary Sleepy Monk coffee will be available for attendees.Glenesslin on rocks

Oregon’s Military Heritage

On Thursday, February 22, the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum will host Oregon authors Alisha Hamel and Warren Aney as they present their book on Oregon’s impressive military heritage.

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A blimp patrols the Oregon Coast. This is Seaside, Oregon.

Oregon’s military heritage goes back thousands of years with native warrior traditions. These native cultures were relatively peaceful and welcomed visiting strangers such as the 1805-06 Army expedition led by Lewis and Clark. The overwhelming numbers of settlers and miners began taking over their traditional grounds. From 1847 to 1880, Army and volunteer units engaged Oregon’s native peoples in eight major conflicts. The Army built several forts from Oregon’s coast to the Snake River.

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Members of the Coast Guard’s mounted beach patrol cross an inlet during their patrol on the west Coast. The use of horses allowed the Coast Guard personnel to cover wide stretches of beach more quickly than on foot. Image courtesy of the U.S. Coast Guard.

The Oregon Militia was first created in 1843 and this led to creation of the Oregon National Guard in 1887. Oregon Guard members and many other Oregonians served the nation in major overseas conflicts from the Spanish-American War through World Wars I and II. As the Pacific Northwest’s well-trained National Guard unit, the 41st Infantry Division served commendably from 1941 to 1945.

Oregonians served heroically in Korea and Vietnam. Recently, Oregon Army and Air National Guard units have been serving in Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts. Oregon’s Militia and National Guard served the state in many civil-support actions, from quelling 1886 riots to Operation Tranquility peacekeeping in 1970 to tackling wildfires and floods.

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A Japanese balloon bomb.

Most Oregonians are completely unaware of Oregon’s long military history, especially its pivotal role during WWII. The authors will give an engaging thirty to forty-minute presentation at the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 22, 2018. They will also have copies of their book, “Oregon Military,” available for purchase.

This event is part of the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum’s annual lecture series. All lectures are free and open to the public. The museum is located at 1387 South Spruce Street in mid-town Cannon Beach. The museum is a private non-profit with a donation based admission program. Thanks to Clatsop County for making this a free event.

This event has been sponsored by Sea Sprite Guest Lodgings in Cannon Beach, Oregon!

On Friday, February 16 at 7:00 p.m., the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum welcomes jazz horn player Dmitri Matheny and friend. The museum is one of three stops of his Oregon tour.

Dmitri Matheny

Acclaimed for his warm tone, soaring lyricism and masterful technique, American flugelhornist Dmitri Matheny has been lauded as “one of the most emotionally expressive improvisers of his generation” (International Review of Music). An honors graduate of the Berklee College of Music, Dmitri Matheny vaulted onto the jazz scene in the 1990s as the protégé of jazz legend Art Farmer. Since then he has garnered critical acclaim and a loyal international following, touring extensively throughout the United States, Europe and Asia, traveling to 19 countries. With over 100 recordings to his credit, Dmitri Matheny has released 11 albums as a leader. His latest is Jazz Noir, a fresh spin on crime jazz, film noir movie themes and timeless classics. The San Francisco Chronicle calls Matheny “one of the jazz world’s most talented horn players.”

Matheny will be promoting the release of his 11th album – Jazz Noir. With the help of a tremendous cast and a repertoire refined over two decades, JAZZ NOIR proves a sinister beauty for fans of rainy city nights and old school noir.”—Earshot Jazz

Mysterious, melancholy and menacing, JAZZ NOIR offers a fresh spin on crime jazz, film noir and timeless classics.

Selections include classic movie themes from Touch of Evil, Laura, Chinatown, Vertigo, Taxi Driver, Blues In The Night, Twin Peaks, Toute Une Vie, High Wall, The Long Goodbye and Stormy Weather, modern standards Estate, Caravan, Here’s Looking At You and Golden Lady, and two originals: Film Noir (from a poem by Dana Gioia) and Crime Scenes, a San Francisco-inspired jazz suite with voiceover narration in the hardboiled style of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler.

The Papillon/BluePort Jazz release, Matheny’s 11th album as leader, showcases the talents of “some of the most accomplished musicians in the western United States” (All About Jazz): Bill Anschell, Matt Clark, Nick Manson, Charles McNeal, Susan Pascal, Phil Sparks, Todd Strait, Akira Tana, Jay Thomas and John Wiitala.

“In these grooves,” writes annotator Eddie Muller, “Matheny leads his crack crew through a sonic history of noir. Dmitri Matheny is an artist who manages to find beauty blooming in the darkest corners.”

“Dmitri Matheny is a jazz treasure. The lyrical Matheny has impressive chops, but it’s his warmth and soulfulness that win you over.”—All Music Guide

Tickets to the concert are $15 each and include complimentary refreshments. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m. with ample time to tour the museum.

The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum is a private non-profit museum featuring seasonal historic, textile, and artistic exhibits. Get your tickets at http://www.cbhistory.org or by phone 503-436-9301. The museum is open from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Wednesday through Monday and is donation based. The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum is located at 1387 South Spruce Street in Cannon Beach, Oregon.

Talking About Dying

Jennifer SasserWhat do we think about when we think of dying? When we think about our own dying, what do we want most? Death is part of the human experience; all of us have experienced loss, and all of us will die one day. Yet conversations about death and dying are difficult and often avoided even with our closest family members and friends.
This is the focus of “Talking about Dying,” a free conversation with Jennifer Sasser on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. at the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum. This program is hosted by the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum and sponsored by Oregon Humanities. This conversation provided an opportunity for participants to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members.
Facilitators of Talking about Dying discussions are trained professionals in the field of chaplaincy, counseling, gerontology, facilitation, and hospice care around Oregon.
Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. For more information about this free community discussion, please contact Elaine Trucke at 503-436-9301 or elaine@cbhistory.org.
Talking about Dying discussions are made possible thanks to the generous support of the WRG Foundation Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation.
Facilitators of Talking about Dying discussions are trained professionals working in the fields of chaplaincy, counseling, gerontology, facilitation, and hospice care around Oregon.
Oregon Humanities (921 SW Washington, Suite 150; Portland, OR 97205) connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Public Program Grants, Responsive Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust

Holiday Celebration

Escape the stress of last minute holiday shopping for a little fun. Join us for an all-day event for both kids and adults on Saturday, December 23.

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Stop by our gift shop to purchase Shannon Martin Holiday Cards.

The museum will host an all-day hot chocolate bar. We’re talking whipped cream, marshmallows, chocolate nibs and more! The no-host treat bar will also have hot apple cider, Sleepy Monk coffee, and sparkling cider. Arts and crafts run from 12:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. The museum will also offer a children’s story time at 12:00 p.m. and face painting from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

Don’t miss the adult story time at 4:00 p.m. with Executive Director, Elaine Trucke. Trucke will recount the tale of the S.S. Mauna Ala, also known as the Christmas ship. Don’t know about it? You’ll have to show up to learn more. The no-host hot chocolate bar will receive an adult upgrade for adult story time.

The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum is a private non-profit museum featuring seasonal historic, textile, and artistic exhibits. Admission is by donation – give what you can. The museum’s normal winter hours are 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Wednesday through Monday. The Cannon Beach History Center & Museum is located at 1387 South Spruce Street in Cannon Beach, Oregon. The museum will be closed on Sunday and Monday, December 24 and 25.

Membership Meeting

Kick Ass Oregon History makes Cannon Beach history funny.
OrHi 52610
Join us for a free meeting of the museum’s membership. Don’t miss this rousing, funny, and spirited presentation on Governor Tom McCall by Kick Ass Oregon History’s own Doug Kenck-Crispin.
Originally from Spokane, Doug came with his family in 1982 and settled in North Portland. He graduated from Lincoln High School. After walking the Earth like Caine for a decade and a half, he earned his BA (cum laude) in History from Portland State University with a minor in Judaic Studies. Doug then completed his MA in History at PSU (Public History & History of Pacific NW). His thesis is titled “Charles A. Moose: Race, Community Policing, and Portland’s First African American Police Chief.” He is the recipient of the 2009-2010 Sara Glasgow Cogan Scholarship.

Doug is the Resident Histor
ian for the podcast Kick Ass Oregon History. He has been featured in Imbibe and Portland Monthly magazines, OPB’s “Oregon Experience,” “Think Out Loud,” “Weekend Edition,” and the season premiere of Esquire TV’s “Best Bars in America.” Oh – and the PSU Vanguard, too! He has written for Portland Monthly, Street Roots newspaper and the Willamette Week. In addition, he hosts various historical speaking series, field trips and historical tours – across the state – that connect people with Oregon. Still a North Portland resident, he does enjoy Pina Coladas, and he LOVES getting caught in the rain.

Doug will be talking about Governor Tom McCall in celebration of this year’s 50th anniversary of HB1601 McCall Beach Bill. McCall is known by many as the man who kept Oregon’s beaches open to the public, but he was so much more. He was an environmental governor, war hawk, republican, documentarian, and politician.

Start off happy hour with a pint of Fort George beer on Saturday, November 18 at 5:00 p.m. at the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum. The museum is a private non-profit located at the corner of Sunset and Spruce in Cannon Beach, Oregon. This event is free and open to the public. For more information call 503-436-9301, visit cbhistory.org of find them on Facebook. Check out their Facebook page. The museum posts daily historic images and information.

Thanks to Cannon Beach Vacation Rentals for sponsoring this event.

Join the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum as we celebrate hometown tourism day! This is the perfect opportunity to be a tourist in your own town. Join us for a free hot chocolate bar, sweet treats, coloring contests, and a trivia/scavenger hunt for kids. We’ll have complimentary Sleepy Monk coffee for all you hard-working parents!

Trivia Design

Everyone who visits will receive 10% off on all gift shop purchases! Admission is free.

The coloring contest will take place on Friday, November 10 and is open to all ages. Expect silly and goofy prizes. We don’t take ourselves too seriously! Come in at any time to participate.

The scavenger and trivia event will take place on Saturday, November 11 and will be conducted all day. So come in at any time! Questions range from the easiest, “What sound does a seagull make?” to something a bit harder, “When was duct tape invented.” Questions will also be hidden in special boxes and eggs throughout the museum. Expect silly prizes!

We will have special hours for Friday and Saturday, November 10 and 11. We will be open from 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. both days. The scavenger/trivia event and coloring contest are free. The refreshments will also be complimentary. Come celebrating surviving the summer with us!

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